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MultiFLEX™ Bioassay Panel Targets Zika and Other Mosquito-borne Pathogens

GenArraytion, Inc. have developed a commercially available PCR based molecular test to identify the Zika virus, a fever-causing disease transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. The Zika virus test works with an existing GenArraytion MultiFLEX™ Bioassay panel that targets viruses that cause dengue fever, yellow fever and Chikungunya, which are also carried by this mosquito and are known to cause febrile disease in humans.

“The Zika virus has the potential to become a serious epidemic, with as many four million people risking exposure in the next year if the mosquito population isn’t controlled, according to the Pan American Health Organization,” said R. Paul Schaudies, Ph.D., CEO of GenArraytion. “GenArraytion’s test directly identifies the virus, thereby making it easier for public health officials to rapidly pinpoint sources of infection and to eradicate infected mosquito populations.”

The Aedes Aegypti MultiFLEX™ Bioassay test targets four genetic regions of the Zika virus, which will minimize the possibility of viral mutations that might enable the virus to escape detection. The Zika virus test, which took less than a month to develop, and other MultiFLEX™ molecular assays help health officials identify infectious diseases in panels with up to 20 genetic markers for fever-causing and vector-borne disease organisms of concern. They are designed to work on bead-based endpoint instruments and real-time PCR platforms.

Currently the Zika tests are available as research use only (RUO) tools that can be used to monitor mosquito populations and identify the presence of harmful pathogens for targeted mosquito eradication.


     
Tags: Dengue Virus, Chikungunya virus, Zika Virus

Date Published: February 15, 2016

Source article link: GenArraytion Inc. » company contact details
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